5 Sins of Japanese Pet Names and How to Avoid Them

Japanese pet names are difficult to get right. They’re not just hard to learn but also hard to pronounce, and they can be embarrassing when you meet someone new. Japanese people love their pets, so it’s natural for them to want a special name reserved only for their furry friend. But that doesn’t mean the name has to be too complicated or unusual! In this blog post we will discuss 5 sins of Japanese pet names and how you can avoid making these mistakes!

First Sin: Making your pet’s name too long. It might seem cute to give a dog an 18-syllable name, but that just makes it difficult for you and anyone else who meets the animal! Stick with short names or abbreviations like “Dogs” instead of “Doggy.”

What about those awesome Japanese words? Avoid making your pet’s name out of no more than four syllables in order to prevent any confusion.

Second Sin: Giving your pet an embarrassing nickname. No one wants their pets getting teased because they have a weird sounding nicknames–especially when children are involved! The best way around this is to stick with something simple like calling them by their full first and last name (if

SIN #0: Giving a human name to your pet. The best way to avoid this is not naming your pets at all, but if you must give them a name it should be an animal or plant name in Japanese rather than giving them the same names as people.

Japanese animal/plant names are much more specific so the chances of having two animals with the same kanji for their (proper) name decreases significantly when compared to other languages like English.

Cats and dogs don’t have any particular meaning associated with their kanji, unlike some breeds of dog like Akita Inu which means “brave” or Shiba Inu which means “brushwood”. So there would probably only ever be one Akita Inu or Shiba Inu in the world, but there might be many cats and dogs.

SIN #0: Giving a human name to your pet. The best way to avoid this is not naming your pets at all, but if you must give them a name it should be an animal or plant name in Japanese rather than giving them the same names as people.

Japanese animal/plant names are much more specific so the chances of having two animals with the same kanji for their (proper) name decreases significantly when compared to other languages like English. Cats and dogs don’t have any particular meaning associated with their kanji, unlike some breeds of dog like Akita Inu which means “brave

A look at five common pitfalls when translating between languages.

*The Japanese word “neko” means both cat and kitten, so a literal translation of the name could be “cat-kitten.” This is confusing for people who are only familiar with one definition. It can also cause problems if you’re planning to bring your pet on an international flight or have it undergo quarantine procedures in another country; many countries require that animals being brought into the country from abroad be quarantined for 30 days before they’ll let them out again, unless they’ve been vaccinated against rabies within 24 hours of entry.*

Text: If you’re struggling to find a good Japanese name for your new feline friend, take some time to think about some of the pitfalls that might come with a bad name.

It’s worth doing research on different names just as we would when picking a new human baby name.

If you’re struggling to find a good Japanese name for your new feline friend, take some time to think about some of the pitfalls that might come with a bad name.

*This means if you want to bring an international flight or have it undergo quarantine procedures in another country; many countries require that animals being brought into the country from abroad be quarantined for 30 days before they’ll let them out again, unless they’ve been vaccinated against rabies within 24 hours of entry.*

*International passengers are only allowed one pet per person and each animal must fit inside a container measuring 22 inches (55 cm) long, 14 inches (35 cm) wide and 18 inches (46 cm) high. The container must also be leak-proof, properly ventilated, made of nontoxic material and approved by the IATA for transport of animals.*

*If your pet is not vaccinated against rabies within 24 hours of entry into a country that requires this vaccine then it will have to stay in quarantine for six months before being allowed out again.*

Want more tips on how to avoid these sins? Check out our new blog post: How To Avoid Sins Of Japanese Pet Names. We’ve got you covered with everything from picking an appropriate name based off its personality traits all the way down to naming conventions that are acceptable in Japan!

The article continues on with the description of five common pet names that are considered sinful, and how to avoid these sins.

Related Link: How To Avoid Sins Of Japanese Pet Names

Article Author: Animal Care Company Staff Member-Natalie Saito

Word Count: 275 words

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After a long day at work, there’s nothing more satisfying than coming home and taking your dog for an impromptu walk or playing fetch in the backyard. But how do you know what to call them? It might seem like such a small thing but it could mean so much by choosing the right name. There are some sins that can be committed when giving pets Japanese names – don’t make these mistakes!

“Nidaime”, “Niwa-chan”, “Koromono-kun”: These names would only ever apply if you had two dogs with those respective names (which is rare). If this wasn’t the case then they couldn’t entertain themselves as they waited for their pack leader to come back.

“Kawaii waisu-kun”: This is a cute name for kittens or bunnies but not cats. Cats are much more independent and have their own personalities, so you can’t treat them like small animals that need to be cared after by the pack leader. “Neko-chan”, “Mimi-koi”, “Miwa-neechan”: These names would never apply unless they were an animal species other than cat (which again, is rare). The only exception being if your pet was also named something else using these words – in which case it’s better to just use one of those two words instead of making up a new word altogether.

Points: You shouldn’t use human names, food items, or numbers. “Shiro-chan”: You shouldn’t use “white” as a color because it is seen as an unlucky word in Japan and should only be used when referring to white animals. Points: Avoid using colors that are associated with bad luck; don’t name your pet after someone else’s pet (or something they would object to). This may lead the person into thinking you’re trying to take their place in their pack. There’s no need for nicknames either unless there are two of the same animal – like siblings who have not yet been named by the owner. In this case, make sure they both get unique and different names! Otherwise, just

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Radhe Gupta is an Indian business blogger. He believes that Content and Social Media Marketing are the strongest forms of marketing nowadays. Radhe also tries different gadgets every now and then to give their reviews online. You can connect with him...

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