9 Mesmerizing Examples Of Diwali Crackers Names

Diwali is a festival that signifies the victory of good over evil. It’s also about celebrating and commemorating the Goddess Lakshmi, who brings prosperity to all during this time as well as unity in family and friendship.

The tradition for Diwali involves creating beautiful crackers (or fireworks) with different colors so that they can be lit up on the day before or even on the night of Diwali itself. The crackers are made by filling them with gunpowder along with other materials such as oil, flour paste, sawdust etc., which gives out bright sparks when it explodes from its containers at various heights into mid-air. These colorful sparkles create an attractive spectacle for everyone around – kids especially love watching these colorful balls of fire dance in the sky.

The tradition also includes giving gifts to family members and friends, as well as donating food or money to those who are less fortunate. In some families, this is done by each person contributing their part of the gift that they have bought for a member from within the same household on Diwali day itself; while others might give away all their purchased gifts at once before going out with friends for dinner etc., so that everyone can enjoy them together later on during celebrations. The custom also involves wearing new clothes and using cleansing water often throughout these days to symbolize our own emotional renewal after celebrating victory over evil (or our inner desire for change).

Diwali Crackers: Simple Traditions For A Worthy Festival

Diwali, which is also known as the festival of lights has a rich and ancient history. Traditionally associated with Hinduism, it celebrates various events including  the victory of light over darkness in ‘Ramayana’ (an Indian epic), triumph of knowledge over ignorance on Makara Sankranti day, and the grudging alliance between Rama’s younger brother Bharata and his stepmother Kaikeyi. It marks an occasion for giving gifts to family members and friends, as well as donating food or money to those who are less fortunate. In some families, this is done by each person contributing their part of the gift that they have bought for a member from within the family.

The festival is celebrated with a lot of fanfare and  excitement, through the lighting of diyas (earthen lamps) in homes and public places, merit making (generosity), gift-giving, social gatherings and festive food preparations such as biryani or pakoras. In some parts of India it has now become customary to make small crackers called ‘diyas’ using firecrackers ie Kacchi Dhadi’s on the occasion which are also lit up during this time. The use of these fireworks in honor of Diwali can be traced back to colonial times when British merchants introduced new traditions into Indian society for example by introducing Christmas trees at this time of year. Today people use various types of fireworks to celebrate the festival, which often include sparklers, firecrackers and rockets.

In present times, Diwali is celebrated with much fanfare. The celebrations start a few days before Deepavali by decorating homes inside and outside in all shades of light  from white (snow) to rainbow colours or just simple yellow lights (oil lamps). Houses are decorated with small clay oil-lamps called “diyas” that are lit up on the eve of this very special occasion as well as during the day at different intervals while people also exchange gifts like clothes, sweets etc. It has now become customary for many Indians to make small crackers called ‘Kacchi Dhadiya’ or ‘Diwali Crackers’.

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Here are nine mesmerizing examples of Diwali crackers: Bhogra, Dholaki, Jhumka, Kacchi Dhadiya, Khichdi Patangi Bolo Dahiya (or Paper Ball), Ladoosi Ladoo Pachpakhri and Paal Papdi.

Bhogra – Bhogra are small crackers that have a cylindrical shape and are usually covered with oil. They come in three variants: white, green, red (or yellow) which represent the earth’s natural colors of black, green and gold respectively.

Dholaki  - Dholakis or ‘diyas’ make for an excellent Diwali Cracker since they offer light as well as sound. These can be made from clay or paper with either one single wick or multiple ones like other diyas/crackers. The most popular paper dholakis are those crafted out of old newspapers called “patangi bolo dhaiya” – these also become handy after the Diwali celebrations are over for cleaning and polishing furniture.

Diwali Crackers: Simple Traditions For A Worthy Festival –  The elaborate decorations that come with each cracker, make it a sight worth watching and often capture memories of childhood where we were mesmerized by fireworks bursting in mid-air; as well as our parents giving us little gifts after their purchase from nearby stores. As tradition goes, some popular choices include ki, Jhumka, Kacchi Dhadiya khichdi Patangi Bolo Dahiya (or Paper Ball), Ladoosi Ladoo Pachpakhri Paal Papdi Bhogra Dholaki or any other varieties you can think of!

Diwali Crackers: Simple Traditions For A Worthy Festival –  This year Diwali falls on the 18th of November and we have found a list of some mesmerizing names for your favorite crackers which you can purchase from any nearby store. We hope that this article inspires you to create memories with loved ones around these crackers!

– Kacchi Dhadiya khichdi Patangi Bolo Dahiya (or Paper Ball)

Makes for a great conversation starter as it is crafted by using old newspapers called “patangi bolo dhaiya” – these also become handy after the Diwali celebrations are over for cleaning and polishing furniture.

– Ladoos

These are a popular Indian dessert – made of beans, sugar and different types of dry fruits.  Some names include: oosi Ladoo Pachpakhri Paal Papdi Bhogra Dholaki or any other varieties you can think of!

– Kajoori Chaat (or) Seviyan ki chaat khichdi with mango for added flavor.

This traditional dish is usually served on Diwali day to welcome the Goddess Lakshmi into your home. It’s also full ingredients like tamarind chutney, coconut oil, sevaiyaan and pieces of fresh veggies such as cucumbers, tomatoes etc. – in each little container that you serve this dish in.

– Khichdi (or) Kheer, Kulfi or any other Indian dessert you can think of!

This dish is usually served on Diwali day to welcome the Goddess Lakshmi into your home. It’s also full ingredients like tamarind chutney, coconut oil, sevaiyaan and pieces of fresh veggies such as cucumbers, tomatoes etc. – in each little container that you serve this dish in.  Some names include: oosi Khicchi Bolo Dahiya Rawa Kheer Telka Kulfi Pista Kajoori Malaika or any other varieties you can think of!

Tip: For those who are adventurous at heart, you can try out the dessert that is made by boiling a mixture of rice and lentils with sugar.

Misal Pav- A traditional Maharashtrian delicacy which consists mainly of rice and dal cooked with vegetables. Tip: This dish is often served as a side at weddings or other celebrations in India! – Mathri, Bhujia – basically anything that’s fried.  This includes small pieces of dough mixed with besan (chickpea flour) and deep-fried to create these delicious snacks which are eaten either plain or dipped into spiced yogurt like raita, chutney etc., they’re also sometimes called suji ka sevaiyaan meaning roasted chick pea flour crispies. They have delightful names such as Jalebi Rawa Sevajaana Batata Ki Sabzi Matar Ka Mirchi Kachori Masala Peethi Kh

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By Radhe Gupta

Radhe Gupta is an Indian business blogger. He believes that Content and Social Media Marketing are the strongest forms of marketing nowadays. Radhe also tries different gadgets every now and then to give their reviews online. You can connect with him...

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