This article discusses the imitative texture in Fair Phyllis, written by John Milton. The author argues that the work changes to an imitative texture at line 18 of Book I which reads: “her eyes were fair as stars.” The author first talks about the many ways that Milton uses imitative text. He then talks about how lines 18-19 of Book I, which are “her eyes were fair as stars,” help illustrate his argument for this change in texture to an imitative one because they use a simile to say that Phyllis’s eyes remind him of starlight. The next two paragraphs talk more about why he thinks these lines and others like them mark a change from imitation to imagery. This article discusses the imitative texture in Fair Phyllis, written by John Milton.. This is where the essay starts talking specifically about what it means when there is an “imitation” or copycat writing style used instead of just using straight up

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